The Classics -- Films, books, etc

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Re: The Classics -- Films, books, etc

Postby debussygirl » Thu Jan 15, 2009 5:28 pm

CullenxLove wrote:
debussygirl wrote:Don't care for Dickens at all, he needs to learn when to shut up. And yes, I know he was paid per word, but if he had just written more stories with the right amount of words then he would have had just as much money.


I have to agree about Dickens, I just had to read A Tale Of Two Cities for english. It was TORTURE! lol

I had to read that too and while I did I wanted to shoot myself.
But I will give the guy credit that he comes up with good stories. Like I read sparknotes on A Tale of Two Cities so I could get better sense of what was going on, and the story was actually good. And I watched Nicholas Nickleby, and if the movie is anything like the book then that was a good story too. He also wrote A Christmas Carol which is a classic. So he had good ideas, he just couldn't write them in an interesting way.
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Re: The Classics -- Films, books, etc

Postby dimber » Sat Jan 17, 2009 3:19 am

Since we're talking about classics and since most of the people in here are American (which I'm not) I have a question to ask:

do you feel there is any difference between English and American-English regarding classics? is there any book/author that's in your English syllabus but you feel is peculiarly American?

The question just came to my mind because I was noticing that all the authors named so far are English...
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Re: The Classics -- Films, books, etc

Postby debussygirl » Sat Jan 17, 2009 2:18 pm

American authors all write about the American Dream. I think it's sorta dull most of the time, because the classics I like are all romances--Austen, Bronte. There aren't any American classics like that I've come across.
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Re: The Classics -- Films, books, etc

Postby WhenTheSunGoesDown » Sat Jan 17, 2009 2:39 pm

I LOOOOOOOOOOVE BREAKFEST AT TIFFANY'S!!!
soooo goood.
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Re: The Classics -- Films, books, etc

Postby Lacuna Scion » Sat Jan 17, 2009 3:17 pm

As far as novels, I'm more to the UK English meself. But as far as movies, you just can't beat good old classic Hollywood. The thirties and forties were magical. I love TCM (that's Turner Classic Movies-- all they play is old black and whites).

When I think of classic AM authors I think Steinbeck, Twain, Fitzgerald, Whitman, Poe, Longfellow that sort. But the classics I really prefer are more Shakespeare, the Bronte girls, Austen, Dickens, Carroll, Stevenson and even Darwin.
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Re: The Classics -- Films, books, etc

Postby Goodnight Elizabeth » Sat Jan 17, 2009 5:02 pm

Dimber: I prefer American Literature. American Literature has many themes and genres that other literature doesn't have: we have the American Dream, of course, but also literature pertaining to slavery, the Civil War, suffrage, and the western frontier. The only frontier work I liked was Willa Cather's My Antonia.

As a woman growing up in the American South, I enjoy reading about the past.

Henry James was an American author whose works are definitely more British than American. He detested being American. Read "Daisy Miller", and you will see. He ridiculed American values and behavior. The way he describes Daisy Miller - you'd think she was a young woman of today.

I never really enjoyed Romantic Literature either before or during college. It's just too much angst. I can tolerate it much more now. Enjoy it? Not yet. ;)
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Re: The Classics -- Films, books, etc

Postby dimber » Mon Jan 26, 2009 1:25 am

It's ironic that here in Italy we have usually different degrees for American and English literature because, for example, Poe and James are in the English curriculum as well. I've come to assume it's a way to have more money since universities and colleges are not private but depend mainly on the state's money.

I agree with you on the fact that there some themes that are peculiar to American authors: the frontier, the slavery and civil war. I think they are extremely interesting, though they're not in my chords, to speak the truth.
In my opinion, classics are just classics, whether they were written by American, Irish or British authors.

Going back to the classics discussion but turning to movies: do you prefer big productions like Gone with the Wind or small familial comedies like It's a wonderful life?
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Re: The Classics -- Films, books, etc

Postby Nerd » Mon Jan 26, 2009 2:34 am

I'm more parial to English classics, myself. I think it's just the way they're written. I have a fascinaton with wrods and how they can be put into sentences, and English authors, in general, just seem to have an amazing ability.

Jane Austen i pretty good. I'm reading Emma and LOVING it. It can be a little drawn out, but some parts are just hilarious. :lol:

Hmmm... Would The Sound of Music be considered a classic? Lol. I've gotten the BIGGEST urge to watch it, but our VHS player needs cleaning. :( I can't get Eidelweiss out of my head. *hums Eidelweiss, Eeidelweiss. Every morning you greet meeeee!
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Re: The Classics -- Films, books, etc

Postby dimber » Mon Jan 26, 2009 10:06 am

I thnk The Sound of Music is definitely a classic!!! I like it, though I prefer An American in Paris much more...

Regarding my own question, I've just realised I haven't replied yet :lol: I usually prefer small familial comedies, not necessarily old. I guess something like When Harry Met Sally can be considered a classic.
I must confess, though, I adore historical movies like Ben Hur - just to talk about some old classic - or Alexander.
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Re: The Classics -- Films, books, etc

Postby Goodnight Elizabeth » Mon Jan 26, 2009 12:59 pm

While in Graduate School I really wish I would've preferred Brit Lit. My Comprehensive Exams were brutal because I had to study 105 years of American Literature. Do you know how many different genres, themes, and movements there are??? My friends who were "smart" studied Brit Lit and only had to focus on maybe one decade - sometimes two. I was so jealous. My advice: go with Brit Lit. Hahahaha :lol:

I love classic movies. I really love old movies. Period. I adore Irene Dunn, Barbara Stanwyck, Rosalind Russell, Cary Grant, Claudette Colbert, Gene Tierney, Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds, Maureen O'Hara, Frank Morgan, and John Payne (yes with a "P"). I think I do prefer the more smaller budget movies. That doesn't mean I don't love Gone With the Wind, because I do. It's one of my favorites, as is The Wizard of Oz. I quoted Singin' in the Rain this morning. Have you seen The Holiday starring Kate Winslet & Cameron Diaz? Kate Winslet's character is given a list of movies that feature women with "gumption." All the women that are mentioned I am huge fans of. You seriously need to watch The Holiday, if you haven't already.
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