The Bella Effect

Where we discuss and converse on topics that have meaning that transcends the Twilight Universe

Moderator: Openhome

Forum rules
Click for Forum Rules

Re: The Bella Effect

Postby Esme echo » Fri Apr 22, 2011 2:50 pm

I'm not sure what you're referring to about Bella leaving her child. Could you elaborate?
"Where there is great love, there are always miracles."
Esme echo
Hanging Up on Jessica
 
Posts: 636
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2008 3:51 pm

Re: The Bella Effect

Postby skatepixie » Sat Apr 23, 2011 12:15 am

Esme echo wrote:I'm not sure what you're referring to about Bella leaving her child. Could you elaborate?


If she were to go to college or get a job right after Breaking Dawn ends.
skatepixie
Buying a Better Raincoat
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2011 5:53 am

Re: The Bella Effect

Postby smitten_by_twilight » Wed Apr 27, 2011 3:34 am

I'm in agreement with the comments about Bella being feminist, making her own choices without regard to society's agendas, etc, but I wanted to return to and elaborate on an earlier point about Twilight being "just fiction."

Chernaudi wrote:I don't feel it's a cop out to say that Bella's a fictionl character, but I do feel that even though we can learn from her and her decisions, she isn't a real person, and that's where we, as real people, we can interpret what he decisions mean and what we can get from them, as long as we don't take it too seriously.


Fiction falls under the larger category of ART. Art is meant to be interpreted by the individual; even if it is driven by the artist's agenda, which Twilight explicitly was not per SM, what the reader gets out of it is not the responsibility of the artist. Art SHOULD provoke thought and discussion and emotion, or it is simple entertainment. Some people will read Twilight and think it promotes bad values; this is great if it encourages them to think through and talk to others about values. Same for any interpretation of any piece of art; no matter what you think about it, as long as you THINK and it has some kind of useful impact on your life, then that is the most that can be expected.

I was a withdrawn, bookish child (approx 200 pgs per day in middle school) who was strongly influenced by the books I read. But I was selective about what I read - not based on what it "promoted," but based on whether I thought it was intelligent and entertaining. Some books had little to say to me. Some books I identified with and loved and still recall fondly - they're still on my shelves, even if I haven't read them in years. One of these authors, Richard Bach, addresses how we adopt ideas from books based on whether or not the idea speaks to us, is congruent with the thoughts and values already in our heads. (This was probably from his book "The Bridge Across Forever," his real-life love story, that I highly, highly recommend.) My 12-yr old son is beginning to read furiously, and I hope that I get to hear some of his thoughts about what he reads. I know that books are not the only influence on his life, and I trust that we have given him a firm grounding to be able to choose wisely about what ideas to adopt.

It's not a cop-out to say that Twilight is just fiction - it is the central point. Because it is fiction we can have these kinds of conversations about right and wrong, what people think, etc. If it were real we would have to make judgments, which would be pretty boring.
My FanFiction Page ~ Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery
Image
Proud Halfway House Cousin Sister! - Team Alice Celebrity Chef - Seeing the future since 1901
User avatar
smitten_by_twilight
Hiding Lauren's Hair Dye
 
Posts: 444
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2011 11:56 pm
Location: Making cinnamon rolls with Edward

Re: The Bella Effect

Postby Esme echo » Wed Apr 27, 2011 12:48 pm

smitten_by_twilight wrote:It's not a cop-out to say that Twilight is just fiction - it is the central point. Because it is fiction we can have these kinds of conversations about right and wrong, what people think, etc. If it were real we would have to make judgments, which would be pretty boring.

I too, have been a voracious reader since middle school (and that was many years ago!) and I have some of my then-favorites on my shelves today. It's interesting to consider those books now; reading them as an adult, some are far better than others!

I don't think we need to make judgments about people when stories are true. In fact, I would much rather read judgments on ficticious characters than on actual living characters! Making judgments concerning events, mores, things, and places is one thing, but judging people something altogether different. One of my more vicious lessons in life was learning that I never knew another person well enough -- nor the sharp sticks prodding them -- to acurately judge their character. Presuming I know better how they should act is a seductive temptation that only highlights my pride and ingnorance.

Reprehensible actions can certainly be condemned, and I believe everyone is accountabie for their actions, but . . . we can never know what a person's potential for change and improvement are. I have witnessed amazing about-faces! Feeling judged is the surest way to hold a person in their same unproductive, self-defeating patterns.

The thing I love about a well-written book --fiction or non-fiction -- is it helps me see myself more clearly. I often think of the movie Shadowlands when this topic comes up. A student of C.S. Lewis' tells him that his father taught him, "We read to see if we are alone." It's so amazing to read an accurate depiction of my emotions in a book! Books give me the tools to think through my attitudes and examine whether I am being reasonable in my positions. A good book makes me a more thoughtful, kinder person.
"Where there is great love, there are always miracles."
Esme echo
Hanging Up on Jessica
 
Posts: 636
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2008 3:51 pm

Re: The Bella Effect

Postby smitten_by_twilight » Fri Apr 29, 2011 2:47 am

Esme echo wrote:I don't think we need to make judgments about people when stories are true.


I am sorry that you latched onto the word "judgment," which I think, from your post, I meant differently than you took. But I do not substantially disagree with anything that you said, and thank you for delineating the distinctions between judging actions, people, and people's potential for change. I enjoyed that you concluded with

Esme echo wrote:Books give me the tools to think through my attitudes and examine whether I am being reasonable in my positions.


which I think suggests that we are not so very far apart on the topic of the function of books. :hello:
My FanFiction Page ~ Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery
Image
Proud Halfway House Cousin Sister! - Team Alice Celebrity Chef - Seeing the future since 1901
User avatar
smitten_by_twilight
Hiding Lauren's Hair Dye
 
Posts: 444
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2011 11:56 pm
Location: Making cinnamon rolls with Edward

Re: The Bella Effect

Postby drJ4twilight » Mon Jul 11, 2011 8:00 am

What?! Bella's character "conservative", "not independent" and "depressing"?
The only depressing thing is this critic's negative view!
No way is the Twilight series 'conservative' or 'sex-stereotyped'.
As many fans correctly point out, the books are fictional to start with.
Also, different things make different people happy. Bella chooses to be emotionally close to Edward - what's wrong with that? Nothing. Alice is a creative character. Esme likes to care for her family. Renee likes adventure and music. Every character is different. The key psychological quality about Bella IS her 'independence' - she is a strong-willed and determined young lady character who pursues what she wants, and gets it. And what about all the uni applications she put it, which Edward encouraged her to do? It's not as if Edward has tried to chain Bells to the kitchen sink, you know.
drJ4twilight
Settled in Forks
 
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Jul 11, 2011 6:31 am

Re: The Bella Effect

Postby Esme echo » Mon Jul 11, 2011 11:31 am

skatepixie wrote:
Esme echo wrote:I'm not sure what you're referring to about Bella leaving her child. Could you elaborate?


If she were to go to college or get a job right after Breaking Dawn ends.


One nice thing about reality is we get to watch "the rest of the story" -- we don't have to depend on dead memories. For me, it's almost like a death when a book ends! I can only imagine what would happened if the story continued. In reality, I love watching families grow up, children begin their own families, the good and bad results of decsions . . . I love watching LIFE all around me! I don't have to imagine what could have happened, the play is proceeding right in front of my eyes: teaching me, entertaining me, and improving me.

Twilight was the first book that ever consumed me to this degree, though I have loved and treasured many, many books. So I yearn to know, "What will happen next?"
"Where there is great love, there are always miracles."
Esme echo
Hanging Up on Jessica
 
Posts: 636
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2008 3:51 pm

Re: The Bella Effect

Postby sarahniamh » Sun Apr 15, 2012 12:32 am

I believe that Bella, though never meant to be a role model, can be viewed as a a role model. in the books she is portrayed as a average shy girl, but she still manages to find love. i think that that is a very positive message for insecure teens who may be experiencing bullying. the will see that there is something to wait for. True they will never find a vampire, but they may find their Edward and that could be enough to keep a girl out of dark places.

The book is full of role models too, when you think about it, Stephanie Meyer brought a bit of awareness to wolves, (an extremely endangered and abused animal) in a way that people can see the pack dynamics. of course she glamed it up to awsomeness, but it was still an awesome move to bring wolves into peoples thought. then people might be moved to help them! that's why i got interested in wolves, so i did research and i have found a place to help them! this is kinda beside the point, sorry. All in all Stephine Meyer has breathed life into many characters who can be seen as a role model. Just as she is one herself. :D


If you are interested in wolf stuff to, check out the website of the place help out. they have awesome pics of wolves, and check out the story of how it came about! brought me to tears!
www.bigoakwolfsanctuary.org
sarahniamh
Settled in Forks
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Apr 14, 2012 2:48 pm

Re: The Bella Effect

Postby VirginiaMay » Wed Apr 18, 2012 2:12 pm

sarahniamh wrote:I believe that Bella, though never meant to be a role model, can be viewed as a a role model. in the books she is portrayed as a average shy girl, but she still manages to find love. i think that that is a very positive message for insecure teens who may be experiencing bullying. the will see that there is something to wait for. True they will never find a vampire, but they may find their Edward and that could be enough to keep a girl out of dark places.


Hi, Sarah! Yes, I think we discussed at the very beginning when this topic first came up that Bella can be considered a role model depending on the values of those looking at her. If you do not share her values, you do not see her as strong. If you are like-minded, you can relate to her character and recognize the strength she has in the areas she excels. One wonderful thing is that she's not perfect. It would be very difficult indeed to live up to, or aspire to, an un-flawed character.

Welcome to the Lex, by the way! I :) Hope to see you around!
User avatar
VirginiaMay
Has Caught Sight of Edward
 
Posts: 1040
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2010 12:02 pm
Location: Sparkling in the Sunshine State

Previous

Return to Great Conversations

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest